Naples, UNITED STATES: Palm trees at a hotel bend in the fierce winds, 24 October, 2005, as Hurricane Wilma slams into Naples, Florida. Hurricane Wilma pounded Florida with torrential rain and some of the strongest winds in its arsenal early Monday as it came ashore in the southern US state, threatening death and destruction. An Air Force reconnaissance plane measured Wilma's winds at 193 kilometers (120 miles) an hour, slightly weaker than when it made landfall, but still making a strong category three storm. "It made landfall at 6:30 (1030 GMT) at Cape Romano," Eric Blake, an official with the National Hurricane Center, told AFP.Cape Romano is about 32 kilometers (20 miles) west of Everglades City, Florida. Landfall marks the official arrival of a hurricane's when the center of its eye reaches land. Quiet usually reigns in the eye of such a storm, with no significant winds, which resume with a vengeance with the back wall of the eye hits land. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

 

It’s the beginning of hurricane season once again, starting June 1st and ending on November 30th. You can’t predict if a hurricane will ruin your travel plans, so it’s important to travel prepared. This is especially important since hurricane season lasts for half of the year and falls during the busy summer travel season. Luckily, travel insurance can help to protect your travel plans. Here are some tips on how travel insurance could help you during hurricane season.

  • Purchase travel insurance before the storm has been named. Travel insurance protects against unforeseeable events, but if the storm exists before you purchase a policy, it is foreseeable. In other words, if you plan to travel during hurricane season, it’s wise to purchase a policy early.
  • Travel insurance can also provide some coverage at home. If you purchase a policy and a hurricane hits your home, before or after you depart, you have coverage to cancel or interrupt your trip.
  • Non-hurricane zones could get the side effects of hurricanes, including stormy weather and major travel delays. Airports in locations unaffected by the storm will still experience flight delays and cancellations if a hurricane hits elsewhere. So even if you’re traveling to a non-hurricane zone, travel insurance should be on your mind.
  • If a hurricane is headed your way, you can call Travel Insured to ask questions about your coverage or to get assistance. Weather permitting, you may be able to get back home before the storm really hits. In unfortunate times like these, you’ll be happy to have travel protection and assistance*.
  • Sometimes a storm doesn’t end up turning into a hurricane, but the weather could still be terrible for a few days. Unfortunately, unpleasant weather is not a covered reason with travel insurance. However, if poor weather is even a slight concern, you can purchase a policy with the Cancel for Any Reason benefit.
  • Cruises can still go out to sea when a storm is coming, simply by avoiding the hurricane’s path. To do so, the ship may leave earlier or from a different port. A lot of passengers could miss the departure, but the Missed Connection benefit could catch you up with the cruise. Cruises may also skip or replace an excursion if it isn’t safe to go there. Travel insurance could reimburse you for those unused, non-refundable, prepaid costs.

If you plan on traveling this hurricane season, consider travel insurance. Unfortunately, storms can cause many travel issues, but at least travel insurance could help to protect your plans. To get a quote now or to find out more about our travel coverage, visit www.travelinsured.com.

Insurance benefits are underwritten by the United States Fire Insurance Company. Fairmont Specialty and Crum & Forster are registered trademarks of United States Fire Insurance Company. The Crum & Forster group of companies is rated A (Excellent) by AM Best Company 2013. Not all coverage is available in all jurisdictions.*Travel Assistance Services are provided by an independent organization and not by United States Fire Insurance Company or Travel Insured International.

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