A few words can describe what it’s like to get delayed on a trip. Annoying. Inconvenient. Time-consuming. Those are words no one wants associated with their vacation. Anything can happen to cause a delay.  Your plane can arrive late or weather conditions can deteriorate. First, keep your cool. Delays can be compounded by frustration. Next, determine your options. Thankfully, there are ways to survive a travel delay and still enjoy your vacation.

Flight Delays

What You Can Do

  • On your travel day, check your flight status. You can use the airline’s app or a third-party app. Try Flight Aware Flight Tracker, Flight View, or TripIt.
  • Contact your travel agent. Agents have a number of tools to assist. If they anticipate delays due to bad weather, for instance, they receive advance waivers to select alternative flights before they sell out.
  • Contact the airline to rebook your flight. Sometimes, a phone call is easier than trying the ticket counter. You can also try rebooking through the airline’s app.
  • Reduce the likelihood of a delay. Book non-stop flights. Fly on off-peak days like Tuesday or Wednesday. Check the delay history of your preferred flights before booking.

What the Airline Can Do

According to the US Department of Transportation, there are no federal requirements for airlines to compensate delayed passengers.* That being said, each airline has its own policies on how to help delayed passengers.

  • If your delay is overnight, the airline may pay for a hotel for the night. They may also offer meal and local transportation vouchers.
  • The airline may pay for you to take an alternate flight with another airline.
  • If you are involuntarily bumped from your flight, the airline may compensate you via check or cash. Some terms may apply.
  • Some airports have invested heavily in waiting areas that can help ease your delay. For instance, Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport has a dedicated yoga room and an aeroponic garden.

How Travel Insured Can Help

  • Travel Insured offers protection plans with travel delay benefits that may reimburse you for non-refundable, prepaid trip costs.
  • A protection plan may provide reimbursement for reasonable accommodations, meals, and local transportation expenses.

Baggage Delays

What You Can Do

  • Contact the baggage claim desk as soon as you notice your baggage is missing. Before you leave the airport, file a delayed baggage claim immediately. Have pertinent information on hand like your reservation number, baggage tag number (found on your boarding pass), description of your baggage, and the address where you’ll be staying.
  • Request an overnight kit. Only a few airports offer it automatically. The kit normally contains basic essentials like shampoo, soap, toothpaste, a toothbrush, a razor and shaving cream.
  • Ask for an allowance for reasonable expenses to cover replacement clothes and other expenses.
  • Wait at least 24 hours for bags to be found. Keep in contact with the airline if they aren’t found in that timeframe.

What the Airline Can Do

  • The airline can track your bags through the “World Tracer” tool. It can check where your baggage is and where it was lost.
  • You are automatically entitled to compensation for necessities like toiletries or clothes. Check the airline’s terms and conditions to see how the airline calculates compensation.
  • A portion of the purchase cost for the articles in your baggage may be reimbursed.
  • If sporting equipment is misplaced, the airline may pay for the rental of replacements.

How Travel Insured Can Help

  • If your baggage is delayed, a protection plan may reimburse you for additional clothing and personal articles that you purchase.

 

A travel delay does not have to end in disaster. Consider a protection plan from Travel Insured as a back-up. Our plans include benefits that may help you recoup a portion of your losses. It’s a great way to exact some control over your trip if you hit a snag. For more information, check out our plans today at www.travelinsured.com.

 

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*https://www.transportation.gov/airconsumer/fly-rights#Delayed-and-Cancelled-Flights